BlogRecovery

Routines: The Magic Ingredient for
Alcohol Free Living

By October 23, 2020 October 28th, 2020 2 Comments

“Recovery is small things done consistently over time.”

—Jill Rathburn

“Recovery is small things done consistently over time.”
-Jill Rathburn

Today I want to impress upon you the power of this statement, with a particular emphasis on the word “done.” 

In our recovery journeys, we are learning so many healing modalities and new ways of thinking about the world, our circumstances, and ourselves. It’s an exciting time of inspiration, integration, and meaningful PURPOSE.

Now, thinking and feeling about these ideas are powerful in their own rights, as they are the stepping stones to what will create the changes we want to see in our lives.

But DOING is where the magic happens!

DOING is what converts our plans into reality!

This is why the Nike slogan is so powerful: “Just do it.” 

Just as an athlete cannot merely think their way into being on top of their game, we cannot only think our way into recovery. 

We must act! We must participate! 

Recovery is an action game.

So, how do we make sure we ACT and DO what we WANT to do, as intended, even when we don’t feel MOTIVATED?

It’s SO much simpler than you think…

We set up a daily system of routines!

“You could say the same thing about working out, starting a business, creating art, and building most habits. The schedule is the system that makes your goals a reality. If you don’t set a schedule for yourself, then your only option is to rely on motivation.”

—James Clear

“You could say the same thing about working out, starting a business, creating art, and building most habits. The schedule is the system that makes your goals a reality. If you don’t set a schedule for yourself, then your only option is to rely on motivation.”
—James Clear

Now, this is not an unfamiliar concept. Most of us are already following some routine, whether intentional or not. On a given day, we likely have a basic set of things we do. 

What is key for us women in recovery is ensuring that these routines are helping achieve our intended goals and outcomes. If unclear, ask the question, is this helping me live an alcohol free life? Is this healing me?

Systems are so powerful, in fact, that when they are poorly designed, they can sabotage a strong, motivated person with even the best intentions. 

Early in my recovery I did not have a consistent routine, and eventually this led to a relapse. From then on, I consistently followed a healthy, easily doable routine to keep me thriving in an alcohol free life.

Early in my recovery I did not have a consistent routine, and eventually this led to a relapse. From then on, I consistently followed a healthy, easily doable routine to keep me thriving in an alcohol free life.

Can you relate to that? I know I can, because early in my recovery I did not have a consistent routine, and eventually this led to a relapse. From then on, I consistently followed a healthy, easily doable routine to keep me thriving in an alcohol free life.

And, because of personal experience as well as coaching other women, one of the first tools I created was the Vitality Trackerthis helps us settle into our recovery lifestyle choices, by organizing daily and weekly tasks. It’s a simple but extremely effective way to plan and track intended health habits.

When we create systems and routines to support our recovery and healing goals, we are both adding to our routines, as well as removing

In this way, we are upgrading the ways we fill our time with the best possible activities to support our goals. 

Thinking of it this way, why would you want to spend even one minute of your time any other way? 

The goal here is to do everything with intention, knowing that we are choosing all of our actions for a purpose.

We can add taking time for stillness and centering to our routines.

“All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.”

― J.R.R. Tolkien

“All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.”

― J.R.R. Tolkien

So when you think of my statement, “Recovery is small things done consistently over time,” remember that those small things you have added are replacing older habits that no longer serve you (and probably never did!). 

My small things done consistently over time include:

  • Doing yoga, breathwork, and meditation
  • Participating in recovery activities: meetings and coaching
  • Eating organic food, especially whole fruits and veggies
  • Getting 9–10 hours of sleep
  • Taking nutritional and energetic supplements
  • Limiting exposure to news and media

The beauty of our day-to-day routines is they are geared to keep us in our sweet spot, help us grow, heal, and stay centered despite what is going on around us

The longer we stay in our recovery routines, the easier it is to live an alcohol free life!

Women in recovery from alcohol use disorder are truly among the most resourceful, determined, successful, and enlightened people I know. 

How do they get there? 

By creating routines for themselves that support their RECOVERY and HEALING goals, doing the same things nearly every day (or small things done consistently over time) to achieve the best years of their lives. 

What are your small things done over time? 

What are your routines to strengthen your recovery?

So stay strong and implement strong systems, Humble Warrior Women!

Namaste,

Jill

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